Herbs for Hair (Tea Rinses for Hair)



I've compiled a list of herbs and recipes tailored specifically to women with naturally kinky/curly hair.

HAIR TEA RINSE BASIC RECIPE:
1 Quart of Water
4 Teaspoons of Whatever Herbs You Choose

Bring water to boil, add herbs, remove from heat. Let sit for an hour. Strain into jar, squeeze bottle, or whatever have you. When it's lukewarm, pour over hair and massage for a few minutes. You can leave it in or rinse out.

HERBS FOR CURLY/KINKY HAIR:
  • burdock root
  • calendula
  • chamomile
  • comfrey leaf & root
  • elder blossoms
  • chamomile
  • nettle
  • rosemary
  • sage
  • marshmallow root
  • lemon blossoms
  • horsetail
  • patchouli
  • parsley
  • coltsfoot
  • red clover
  • sandalwood
  • irish moss
  • southernwood
  • geranium
  • lavender
  • blue malva herb
I also found a website that sells the tea bags for hair: Local Harvest. Etsy also has some herbal tea rinses, click here to see.
Updated post, originally posted 1/27/09

12 comments:

  1. My grandma told my mom about this when I was younger. I hated it because I didn't see any suds. Didn't really pay attention to the effects it had on my hair. I might revisit one day, but as for right now I'm sticking to my new love -- Phyto!

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  2. What does the tea do? Is this in lieu of shampoo?

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  3. You know i jumped on the bandwagon cuz your hair is so amazing.. Just ordered some of the Rosemary tea rinse....PLENTY of it too... the localharvest.com site is the BOMB period!!

    You are amazing with the knowledge or shall i say the "dedication" to do the research leading to the knowledge. Keep it up, we right here with ya..
    Later,

    Ms. NSC on that Fotki!!

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  4. I agree - right here with ya...your dedication to natural hair is wonderful its like a bible I just order some rosemary & nettle from local harvest!!

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  5. WavesofmotionJanuary 01, 2009

    I like this post because I love natural things that prove beneficial to my hair. I love to boil teas and let them cool and use them as a final rinse over my hair. These teas help in my opinion to reduce shedding and help promote healthy hair growth. I also use several teas and herbs and infuse them in oil to use as a scalp conditioning oil. The herb infused oils help to promote a healthy head of hair.

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  6. Thanks for the list. I was researching herbs. You made this easy for me.
    How did your results come out? I was thinking of substituting an herbal rinse for conditioner (not my deep condish though) Although I can't find any info on that on the internet. Did you come across any in your research? But, I will be using it as my new leave in (instead of KC Knot Today) and in my own herbal hair oil.

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  7. Thank you for posting this! What is your regimen? I really wanted to know more about tea rinses and I plan to order from the website tomorrow.

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  8. I've definitely been thinking about using some herbal rinses, especially since I can pretty much get them for free from my mother who drinks them all the time. I need to find out what herb does what.

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  9. i did a tea rinse with regular old lipton tea after cowashing and it did soo much for me in the shedding area.. ill be doing this all the time now

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  10. My grandmother is from the islands and she would rinse her hair with green, ginseng, and even black tea! she told me that it opened up the pours and made your hair feel fresh. I just laughed it off like old folklore from the islands. My grandmother is 74 and she does not have bald spots or thining hair! she also used coconut juice and would apply it to her hair like a leave in conditioner! her kinky hair was always soft and managable! I guess this stuff works! I will try it!

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  11. i use shikakai powder from the indian store and use it as a tea rinse occasionally.

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  12. I just ordered from Local Harvest because I've been searching everywhere to find a tea rinse for the value. Thanks for the link!

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